The Sure Path to Failure: Ignore the Basics

The Sure Path to Failure: Ignore the Basics

Article by Jason Hreha | Featured on Inc.com

Stop. Whatever you’re doing right now; please, just stop.

I need you to take two deep breaths. I need you to take four steps back. Look at the scene in front of you. Look at the problem you’re trying to tackle. Perhaps you’ve just joined a new company and you’re trying to figure out what to do. Or maybe you just started a new relationship, and are overwhelmed by all of the potential paths forward. Maybe you’re analyzing a marketing campaign, or doing a review of a product you’re working on.

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7 Crucial Lessons People Learn Too Late in Life

7 Crucial Lessons People Learn Too Late in Life

Article By Nicolas Cole | Featured on Inc.com

Life lessons are full of wisdom because they often have to be learned the hard way. However, the hardest part about that process is realizing that sometimes not every opportunity lasts forever. You finally “get it” long after the fact.

If possible, it’s best to learn these things sooner rather than later.

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5 Methods of Learning That Set Successful People Apart

5 Methods of Learning That Set Successful People Apart

BY JUSTIN BARISO | Founder, Insight | Article Featured on Inc.com

Want to work smarter? Incorporate these five rules into your daily habits.

How do you define success? We all measure prosperity in different ways. But it doesn’t really matter what your personal goals are. The key to getting better at anything is summed up in one word:

Learning.

That’s why the most successful people, regardless of what they’re trying to accomplish, strive to incorporate five simple rules into their daily habits. If you want to be a successful learner, make sure to:

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What the Most Resilient People Have in Common

What the Most Resilient People Have in Common

Article by LOLLY DASKAL | Featured on Inc.com

The truth is that life can be tough, business can be hard-hitting and success comes with challenges. What separates those who can hold their own and keep going in times of adversity is a cluster of habits that center on resilience.

Resilience means developing a strong solid level of mental toughness. We aren’t born with it–it’s a habit you develop, a skill you learn. And it’s absolutely essential.

Here are four core habits of the most resilient people:

1. They’re connected to their emotions.
Resilient people understand their emotions and how to manage them. Some people say that suppressing what you feel is the best approach when you’re going through tough times, but it’s just the opposite–suppressing your emotions can backfire. People who are highly anxious or have a lot on their minds tend to struggle with unwanted thoughts. Resilient people are connected to their emotions and self-aware, which gives them more control.

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What Leaders Actually Do to Inspire and Motivate

What Leaders Actually Do to Inspire and Motivate

BY MARCEL SCHWANTES Principal and founder, Leadership From the Core | Featured on Inc.com

Lets leave intellectual theory behind. These are the nuts and bolts of great leadership, and you can apply it starting today.

Back when I was doing the corporate grind, Bruce was the first boss (and my favorite to this day) that exposed me to the very practice of “Servant Leadership.” That’s how he led, and a decade later, I had the formula for a leadership training startup.

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Everything About Great Leadership Comes Down to This Essential Question

Everything About Great Leadership Comes Down to This Essential Question

Article by Marcel Schwantes | Featured on Inc.com

If you think you’re a good boss now, this may change your perception.

I’m going to let the cat out of the bag. If you haven’t noticed yet, this column is heavily slanted toward promoting a best-in-class leadership philosophy the business world has yet to fully discover. It’s as if I were writing about 3-D printing 20 years ago.

And that philosophy is the timeless concept of “servant leadership.”

I would describe servant leadership as a set of practices that enriches the lives of individuals, builds better organizations, and ultimately creates a more caring workplace where people love what they do, and whom they work with.

If this sounds to you like some sort of sweet, idealistic Norman Rockwell portrayal of corporate life, I beg to differ.

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5 Myths That Stop People From Being Successful

5 Myths That Stop People From Being Successful

BY BENJAMIN P. HARDY | Featured on Inc.com
If you don’t appreciate what you already have, then more won’t be a good thing in your life.

One reason most people aren’t successful is that they believe myths they’ve been taught about success.

The following myths need to be uprooted from our subconscious, so we can have the freedom to create the life we want.

1. Competition is good.

“All failed companies are the same: they failed to escape competition.” – Peter Thiel

Competition is extremely costly to maximum product reach and wealth creation. It becomes a battle of who can slightly out-do the other for cheaper and cheaper. It’s a race to the bottom for all parties involved.

Competing with others leads people to pursue goals that aren’t really their own – but what society has deemed important. You could spend your whole life trying to keep up, but will probably have a shallow life. Or, you can define success for yourself based on your own values and detach yourself from the noise.

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The Hidden Flaw In Behavioral Interview Questions

The Hidden Flaw In Behavioral Interview Questions

We’ve all used behavioral interview questions—questions that ask job candidates to recount a past experience so we can assess their likely future performance. In theory, behavioral interview questions should work just fine (because past behavior is usually a decent predictor of future behavior).

But most interviewers ask behavioral questions in a way that gives away the correct answer and thus ruins the question’s effectiveness.

Here are some pretty typical behavioral interview questions:

  • Tell me about a time when you adapted to a difficult situation and how you did it.
  • Tell me about a time when you had to successfully balance competing priorities.
  • Tell me about a time when you were bored on the job and what you did to make the job more interesting.
  • Tell me about a time when you successfully persuaded someone to see things your way.

You probably noticed that all of these questions ask the candidate to recount a time when they ‘successfully’ did something. The candidate is asked about times they adapted to a difficult situation, balanced competing priorities, made their job more interesting and successfully persuaded someone. And that leads us to the flaw in these questions.

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